VVAW: Vietnam Veterans Against the War
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Some Photos from the 1990s

It all started in 1967, with six Vietnam veterans marching together in a peace demonstration. Now, fifty-two years later, VVAW is still going strong-- continuing its fight for peace, justice, and the rights of all veterans.

Explore these pages; see what we've done, what we do, and why we do it. The struggle continues, perhaps these days more than ever. VVAW has never stopped working to protect the welfare of those who served their country.

Will you join us?


VVAW Library in Vietnam Project: ,
April 20 - September 30, 2019
Support VVAW's Library in Vietnam Project
(More Info)

Latest Commentary: New crises, new dangers, new possibilities. Since our last issue, it seems we have entered a new era, with ever-compounding crises in politics and environment. At the same time, there are new possibilities in politics and citizen activity with fresh new faces and voices in Washington a...

Taken from "From the National Office" by Joe Miller Read More


View and sign the 50th Anniversary Guestbook

Excerpt From  THE VETERAN:  Now Online

Taken from Another Agent Orange Victim: In Memory of Norman (Bill) F. Williams Jr. by Beverly Williams:

Norman F. Williams Jr., known to family, friends and anyone who met him as Bill, was born on July 17th, 1944 in Jackson, MS. When he was six weeks old, his family moved to Norman, OK and then at six years old, moved to Little Rock, AR. He grew up there and lived there until he joined the Marine Corps. He was greatly influenced by both his parents. His mother was Cherokee Indian, and Bill spent a lot of time with her family growing up. Many of his beliefs were formed by those early years. His spirituality, sense of honor and obligation, and love of nature and all things natural were bred and ingrained in him from birth. His father was Welsh and a geologist. He served as State Geologist of Arkansas for almost 50 years. But more than that, he was a Lt. Colonel in the Army Reserve after a stint in the Army during WWII. His love of this country as well as his sense of duty and service were passed on to his son.... Read More


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